At Seus Family Farms, our roots run deep.

Today's farming operation is the result of 3 generations of hard work, innovation and dedication to high-quality crop production. The continuity of these principles has allowed the farm to excel in growing specialty crops while expanding in both size and production capability.  Seus Family Farms began in 1946 when Edward (Ed) Seus put his name in the pickle jar and was drawn for a Tulelake homestead after his service

After arriving in Tulelake, Ed stuck his pin on the map and he and Esther drove out to the location staked out by the Bureau of Reclamation as their new home. For several years, the family lived in surplus barracks brought to their homestead from the nearby Japanese Internment Camp until they were able to construct a house of their own. Over time, that 72-acre homestead was built up into the home, shop and surrounding fields that still serves as the farm headquarters today. In the early days, Ed did double-duty running his newly-established farm and managing Newell Grain Growers Association. Ed's work at the grain growers' association helped many local farmers market their crops

After arriving in Tulelake, Ed stuck his pin on the map and he and Esther drove out to the location staked out by the Bureau of Reclamation as their new home. For several years, the family lived in surplus barracks brought to their homestead from the nearby Japanese Internment Camp until they were able to construct a house of their own. Over time, that 72-acre homestead was built up into the home, shop and surrounding fields that still serves as the farm headquarters today. In the early days, Ed did double-duty running his newly-established farm and managing Newell Grain Growers Association. Ed's work at the grain growers' association helped many local farmers market their crops and build a livelihood of their own. Ed came to Tulelake with some farming experience and equipment of his own, but quickly learned that the unique climate and growing conditions of the area demanded adaptation and innovation for success. Ed grew a variety of grains on his farm, as well as bluegrass and clover. He developed a wide variety of farm implements to meet the needs of the farm, including the Seus Seed Snuffer, a harvest implement perfectly suited to his own seed crops. In 1954, Ed was the first Seus to grow horseradish which was a new, innovative crop for the area.

in the US Coast Guard. Ed and his wife, Esther, packed up their belongings and moved from Hillsboro, OR to begin their new life in Tulelake, CA. Anticipating picturesque, lakeside living, the Seus' were surprised to find their new home to be the fertile lakebed exposed by the Bureau of Reclamation's drainage of Tule Lake. In spite of the unexpected conditions, the Seus' eagerly dove into their new life of farming and feeding a hungry nation. 

Today's farming operation is the result of 3 generations of hard work, innovation and dedication to high-quality crop production. The continuity of these principles has allowed the farm to excel in growing specialty crops while expanding in both size and production capability. Seus Family Farms began in 1946 when Edward (Ed) Seus put his name in the pickle jar and was drawn for a Tulelake homestead after his service in the US Coast Guard. Ed and his wife, Esther, packed up their belongings and moved from Hillsboro, OR to begin their new life in Tulelake, CA. Anticipating picturesque, lakeside living, the Seus' were surprised to find their new home to be the fertile lakebed exposed by the Bureau of Reclamation's drainage of Tule Lake. In spite of the unexpected conditions, the Seus' eagerly dove into their new life of farming and feeding a hungry nation. 

and build a livelihood of their own. Ed came to Tulelake with some farming experience and equipment of his own, but quickly learned that the unique climate and growing conditions of the area demanded adaptation and innovation for success. Ed grew a variety of grains on his farm, as well as bluegrass and clover. He developed a wide variety of farm implements to meet the needs of the farm, including the Seus Seed Snuffer, a harvest implement perfectly suited to his own seed crops. In 1954, Ed was the first Seus to grow horseradish which was a new, innovative crop for the area.

Monte was a month old when the family moved to Tulelake, and helped his dad on the farm from a young age. He worked with his brother and sisters to build the family farm's grainery, which enabled the farm to become more independent through on-site grain storage. That original grainery is still used by the farm today for cleaning and storing grain seed.

Monte and Cathy took over the family farm upon Ed's retirement in the 1970's. By the time that Monte took over the farm, Ed had built the operation to about 300 acres from the original 72.

As a young farmer, Monte worked aggressively to expand the farm into the dehydrator onion business and continued the production of high-quality horseradish. Monte focused on improving the all-around efficiency of the farm, especially through the development and addition of new machines for harvest.

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furthering the farm

our family

From a young age, Scott helped his dad, Monte, on the farm in any way that he could. Scott took time off of school on many occasions to help with harvest, completing his schoolwork at night after the fieldwork was done. Scott attended Cal-Poly, San Luis Obispo from 1991-1997 studying Ag Business with concentrations in Crop Science and Farm & Ranch Management. This education served as a strong foundation for his return to the family farm in 1997. The farm began raising peppermint that same year, completing the triad of primary crops which are still grown on the farm today. Peppermint tea was first raised as an alternative to peppermint oil, in an innovative response to the Federal shutoff of irrigation water during 2001. Scott and Sara were married in 2002, and took over the family farm as their own in 2006. Since then, they have worked hard in order to expand their mint and horseradish operations while carefully managing the farm. They have focused on increasing their farm's efficiency and the adaptation of

From a young age, Scott helped his dad, Monte, on the farm in any way that he could. Scott took time off of school on many occasions to help with harvest, completing his schoolwork at night after the fieldwork was done. Scott attended Cal-Poly, San Luis Obispo from 1991-1997 studying Ag Business with concentrations in Crop Science and Farm & Ranch Management. This education served as a strong foundation for his return to the family farm in 1997. The farm began raising peppermint that same year, completing the triad of primary crops which are still grown on the farm today. Peppermint tea was first raised as an alternative to peppermint oil, in an innovative response to the Federal shutoff of irrigation water during 2001. Scott and Sara were married in 2002, and took over the family farm as their own in 2006. Since then, they have worked hard in order to expand their mint and horseradish operations while carefully managing the farm. They have focused on increasing their farm's efficiency and the adaptation of technology, most notably through the use of drones and GPS. Today, Scott and Sara are proud to share the daily excitement of running the farm with their three children, Spencer, Emma and Charlotte. Spencer began driving combine in 2016 and all three children share a curiosity and knack for learning the in's-and-out's of the farm and its operations, all while participating in local 4-H clubs and maintaining excellent grades at school.

technology, most notably through the use of drones and GPS. Today, Scott and Sara are proud to share the daily excitement of running the farm with their three children, Spencer, Emma and Charlotte. Spencer began driving combine in 2016 and all three children share a curiosity and knack for learning the in's-and-out's of the farm and its operations, all while participating in local 4-H clubs and maintaining excellent grades at school.

Seus Family Farms - 2284 County Road 100 - Tulelake, CA - 96134
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